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Pursue your own adventure

Matts Bates, Motorcross champion  
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What's happened to sport today?

The Premiership is all over - bar the shouting. The Six Nations has produced a series of dull encounters that offers little chance of any of the home nations winning the next World Cup. And England's cricket tour of India has been a bit of a damp squib with the game progressing at a snail's pace.

Where's all the fun and excitement gone?

Watching sport just isn’t as captivating as it used to be and more men are leaving their armchairs to create their own excitement by participating in adventure sports. There’s a new breed of men emerging and they’re determined to take sport to the next level by pursuing high-octane activities that push them to their physical limits and have high adrenaline rewards. These thrill seekers are definitely ready for a new challenge.

Saturday April 29th sees just such a challenge in the first ever Drambuie Pursuit. This exhilarating mental and physical team challenge will take place across the breathtaking scenery of the Scottish highlands. A once in a lifetime opportunity, this adrenalin packed event will have the participating teams white water rafting, abseiling, mountain biking, kayaking and racing rage buggies whilst being filmed by helicopter cameras.

It was across the Scottish highlands more than 250 years ago that the Drambuie adventure began and now continues in 2006 with the Drambuie Pursuit. In 1746 a defeated Bonnie Prince Charlie passed on the secret recipe for the Drambuie liqueur to his loyal clansman in gratitude for their helping him escape from the clutches of the English army. Today people around the world are enjoying Drambuie & Soda –a generous measure of Drambuie in a tall glass with ice, topped up with soda and two wedges of fresh lime.

Over the years Drambuie has been enjoyed by generations carrying with it this spirit of adventure, culminating in this exciting event, which will see ten teams retracing Bonnie Prince Charlie’s steps across the wild Scottish terrain.

Matt Bates, Motorcross Champion and pursuit events organiser, joins us live online on Friday 31st March at 1200hrs to discuss why more men are participating in high octane sports. He’ll also be able to tell you how you can take part in next year’s Drambuie Pursuit.

TRANSCRIPT:

Host: Mark Ryes (MR)
Guests: Matt Bates (MB)

MR: Hello there, welcome along to today's show, I'm Mark Ryes. Do ordinary sports thrill you or not really? The Premiership's all over bar the shouting, I guess. How about The Six Nations? Did we really get involved or was there something a little bit missing do you think? Well, if you think there's something missing from your sporting life I've got an idea for you and joining me in the studio today is Matt Bates, a motorcross expert and Matt, this is all about the Drambuie pursuit happening on Saturday April 29th. We'll go into it in more detail but don't you think extreme sports are becoming more and more popular? Does that mean you have to be mad to take part in them?

MB: I think a little bit, that's fairly natural but I think extreme sports and urban sports, all these sort of things where it's easy to take part, it's thrilling and all the rest of it, people actually want to do it, there's more and more people want to do that now than ever and that's going to continue to grow the more these type of events are put together.

MR: And more and more are being put together of course it's happening presumably because the demand is there.

MB: Yeah, that's right. There's millions of people out there that tune in to watch these sort of programmes on TV and they can see that they can take part and not only can they take part but they can take part from a really young age so that's why now, all of a sudden, you're getting the second generation skateboarder, BMX-er and so on. They're getting the kids involved and so it's something families can get involved in.

MR: And of course we're here because we're talking about the Drambuie Pursuit. But how does Drambuie fit into all this? Will has sent us a question, of course you can send us a question as well, make sure that you do. The little box underneath where you're watching us, you can submit your questions here to the studio. Will wants to know, "How does Bonnie Prince Charlie fit into the whole Drambuie Pursuit?"

MB: Okay well the Drambuie Pursuit is really following the route that Bonnie Prince Charlie took to actually leave the country.

MR: Sure, yeah.

MB: And except that we're doing it in a reverse way, we're going from the Isle of Skye to Inverness and along that route we'll take in seven or eight different activities. So that's obviously the Drambuie connection and then the route that we're taking and that's how it really brings in Bonnie Prince Charlie.

MR: And Bonnie Prince Charlie of course was the one who came up with the Drambuie recipe; he was the one who gave it to his clansmen so for it to be named after him I suspect is pretty good really actually, isn't it.

MB: Yeah.

MR: And of course if you want to find out more about Drambuie we've got a link at the bottom of our page that you're watching us on. You can go to the website there and find out more for yourself as well. We've got a question from Tommy, "What inspired the Drambuie Pursuit?" because this has been quite a while in the making, hasn't it?

MB: Yeah it has. The inspiration comes from when you go up to that part of the world. It's a fantastic place and there's so many activities that are going on up there.

MR: Is that because it's wild and you're able to kind of actually have more of a wild time up there within the Highlands?

MB: Yeah, I think so. I think everyday life up there is about going out, walking mountains, hills and taking part in ...

MR: Certainly harder than urban life isn't it.

MB: That's right. That's right and that's why we've really looked at that and thought, right, 'What are people doing up in that part of the world?' and that's what they're doing. We're just trying to link it all together.

MR: And of course this is the very first one. Well we'll come into more detail about exactly what you'll be doing and the route in a moment's time. Daniel wants to know, "What's motorcross racing and what inspired you to get into it?" This is going back into your background and suggesting why you're such a tough man for the challenge so what got you into the motor sport in the first place?

MB: I got into it from a really young age when I was about eight or nine having a family that were always into motorbikes. Off-road motorcycling was all you could do at that age because obviously you can't ride on the road and so I started to compete and before long I just improved and improved and really by the time I was fifteen I was fortunate enough to turn professional and start to actually earn a few quid at it.

MR: But does that mean that you have to start young though? Did you have to start that young to be able to turn professional that early?

MB: I think it gives you a better chance, like any sport whether it be tennis or what we're talking about now, you need to start young to get some level behind you before you start to turn professional.

MB: It can be. People that are better than me and always have been haven't come from that background so that's not the most important thing it just helps if your family have got a keen interest in it.

MR: I guess so. So what would you say is your key - your most proud achievement is?

MB: When I was young I won an awful lot when I was fifteen, sixteen and then being able to ride for your country which I did a couple of times and winning internationally and let's not forget the fact that it's about earning money as well.

MR: Of course it is.

MB: You know, if you earn a decent amount of money at it then it's great.

MR: It becomes a job, absolutely!

MB: And the best thing about it is the people. You know you meet so many different people and hopefully the guys that are going to be on this Drambuie Pursuit are going to be this type of people. They're young, fit, energetic, into their sports but kind of like a night out as well and that's what it's about. So that's the beauty of these sorts of sports.

MR: Of course it is. Peter has sent us an interesting question and thanks for your question, Peter, "Do you have any motorcross or daredevil heroes?" I think that's quite nice, what are your thoughts on Evel Knievel, for instance?

MR: Of course it is. Peter has sent us an interesting question and thanks for your question, Peter, "Do you have any motorcross or daredevil heroes?" I think that's quite nice, what are your thoughts on Evel Knievel, for instance?

MR: I wasn't talking the toy but fair enough.

MB: My heroes are, going back really, Barry Sheen, for me he still is an icon.

MR: Of course

MB: But I think every time I switch on the telly I've got a different hero in any type of extreme sport.

MR: Really?

MB: Because if you see some of the things people are doing on a surfboard or a kayak or whatever it might be or in motor sport and it's overwhelming. There's so many people that you look up to and think, 'Wow, that's incredible!'

MR: You're at this point in your life now, so who are your heroes now? Who are you looking at in motorcross and thinking, 'They are absolutely the biggest thing'?

MB: They're Americans.

MR: Really?

MB: Sure.

MB: And a couple of other guys, a guy called Ricky Carmichael, they're household names in America, they're earning millions and millions. They're on a par with our Premiership footballers.

MR: But why, why has it taken off in America so much? Why are the champions coming from America then?

MR: But why, why has it taken off in America so much? Why are the champions coming from America then?

MR: Right.

MB: And the vast size of the country, they're selling, in their industry of biking, they're selling maybe in the region of half a million off-road bikes compared to our market of a region of fifteen thousand a year.

MR: That's a lot, isn't it.

MB: Yeah, that's right.

MR: Does that mean that the industry is backing them more though?

MB: Yeah absolutely, the industry has to because if that's where the finances are, they're making a lot of money out of selling bikes, obviously the majority of bikes are made in Japan, they'll back that and they're making heroes out of these guys.

MR: It really is incredible because once you get to that kind of level the TV rights pick up and it becomes like the Premiership in Britain.

MB: That's right.

MR: And now it's almost a self-fulfilling prophecy, isn't it.

MB: Yeah, of course it is and that's really once I've finished racing I looked to that and thought, 'Right, okay, I need to emulate what they're doing here in America where they're putting on these eighteen to twenty events in stadiums and an average of seventy thousand people are watching these events. I need to put that on here.' My business now is putting on events but mainly putting on these types of events in arenas and stadiums around this country.

MR: Do you still bike, by the way?

MB: Yeah, yeah.

MR: Just for fun now?

MB: Yeah, just for fun every now and then I'll go and race and, like everything, the idea was when I turned up in the morning was to just have a fun day out but it doesn't, the red mist comes down and you want to win everything in sight.

MR: Well, I have to say if you're looking at Matt here and you're thinking, 'Well he appears to have two arms and two legs and a head and it's all in one piece' I've got a very good question from Jake, "Have you ever been badly injured?"

MB: Yes Jake, I have actually, a couple of times. Let's not forget you can get injured doing anything, okay.

MR: True, fair enough but only a thrill-seeker would say that, to be fair.

MB: Yeah, you'd be really surprised, we're pretty well protected. The worst injuries I've had are - I've had a lot of dislocations and torn ligaments and things like that and yeah, I have broken both arms and wrists and shoulders and collar bones and all that sort of thing.

MB: Yeah, you'd be really surprised, we're pretty well protected. The worst injuries I've had are - I've had a lot of dislocations and torn ligaments and things like that and yeah, I have broken both arms and wrists and shoulders and collar bones and all that sort of thing.

MB: Yeah exactly. But no, your injuries, that's natural, it really is and you will get injuries in any sport. And it's normally not injuries through crashing; it's normally injuries through the most stupid of things. Not warming up properly and not being fit enough and not concentrating and you're going to hurt yourself.

MR: It's interesting that you raised concentration because that's something that I wanted to talk to you about. In all extreme sport, the level of concentration, it's not just about the high, is it. It's about really focusing.

MB: Yeah, yeah and that's what makes it what it is because once you've done it, people will say to you, whether that be base-jumping or abseiling or white-water rafting, people will say, 'How do you do that?' Well actually you don't think about it, you just crack on and do it because you're concentrating about what you're doing and then afterwards that buzz and the adrenalin is once you've finished. You then look back at what you've done and that's what's thrilling, that's what I class a thrill.

MR: Can anybody really take part in an outdoor pursuit? Presumably you're reasonably healthy.

MR: Can anybody really take part in an outdoor pursuit? Presumably you're reasonably healthy.

MR: But I'm a ten stone weakling. Is it something that anybody can do?

MB: Yeah. I believe that the pursuit that I'm putting together with the Drambuie Pursuit that's going to be in Scotland, I believe most people can go and do that. If you're into sport you have a level of fitness, you don't have to have trained for six months to be able to compete in this and this is the different angle that we're looking at with pursuit. It's not about being an adventure racer.

MR: Absolutely, because if you do the Marathon or the half-Marathon you've got to train, you've got to train.

MB: Yeah, you've got to train but this is about fun.

MR: So it is about fun but it will be mentally, physically challenging, won't it.

MB: Yeah, absolutely. It will be very difficult, it will be hard work but I think we've got the level right with this where we'll run the event and at the end of it people will get that buzz from it and they'll realise, 'We didn't have to train for six months for this. It's not something that we've had to think about every day of our lives for the last six months. It's just been a great bit of fun and we've achieved something from it.'

MR: Just before we talk details about the actual events that are happening within the pursuit itself, we've got a great question from Dean and thank you for your question, Dean. Remember you can still send your questions at the box at the bottom of the screen. He wants to know, "What's your idea of the ultimate thrill-seeking outdoor pursuit. What would you aim at?"

MB: I think, as I've been up in Scotland a lot recently and looked a lot at what's going on, white-water rafting is something that I really think is great.

MR: But I'm surprised that's something that you've never done.

MB: Yeah, I know, that is. And that's why it's really captured me because a lot of these things I haven't done and I'm only just starting to do this. So I've come from the really extreme side of jumping motorbikes sixty feet in the air to the other side of extreme sports that are actually about you getting into something like a white-water raft. I think that's the ultimate, I think that would be a great thrill.

MR: How about zorbing, when you go down in a great big ball down the hill?

MB: Yeah, I just think that's mad.

MR: Haha! Even you think that's mad!

MB: Yeah, I can't see the benefit of that. You might as well just put yourself in a rubber ring and just go and throw yourself off a cliff.

MR: Apparently, they do say it's a bit like being in a washing machine.

MR: Apparently, they do say it's a bit like being in a washing machine.

MR: Apparently, they do say it's a bit like being in a washing machine.

MB: Yeah, as far as pursuit events, go this is the first one but you don't have to be a scientist to go and work out how these things are put together. The events that I've put together are all geared around extreme sports which are motorcross, skate, BMX, freestyle motorcross and we've done a lot of those in the last seven years and we're now just applying that expertise and events skill into this sort of sport.

MR: So I guess you've gone, 'We're doing these individual events, now let's take it one stage further.'

MR: So I guess you've gone, 'We're doing these individual events, now let's take it one stage further.'

MR: Well I have to say, just talking to you I'm quite excited about the idea. The event is closed for this year. You've got everybody that's taking part for this year but we are thinking about next year already so if you're excited about what you're hearing don't forget, have a look at the website link at the bottom of the page and find out more about how we can take part next year. You've actually got that website address in case people want to rush to it.

MB: Yeah, it's www.drambuiepursuit.com.

MR: That's pretty easy really, isn't it, www.drambuiepursuit.com. So we've talked about your ultimate kind of thrill-seeking, let's talk about the Drambuie Pursuit itself. Now it's happening the end of April.

MB: Yeah, April 29th is the main day for it. We'll be bringing forty individuals to Inverness itself.

MR: That's quite a group to organise, isn't it.

MB: Yes it is, yeah it really is. And we're not just letting them go and saying to them, 'Right you need to get from point A to point B as quick as possible.'

MR: No, fair enough.

MB: We've staged a number of activities for them to do.

MR: Well okay, look, we can see the pursuit on the screen now and the map of the pursuit. So this is the first area that you're going to, I mean what fabulous scenery there. So you're going from the Isle of Skye to the castle.

MB: That's right, that's it. When we start the event you'll start off at the Eilean-Donan castle which is just the most fantastic venue that there is, it's just incredible.

MR: Yeah, it looks it.

MB: From there you'll go to the Isle of Skye where each individual will get into ribs.

MR: Well, let's look at the pictures here as well because you go through to Invergarry and to Drumnadrochit, what a great name. So white-water rafting we've seen. What's the car up the top there?

MB: We've got rage buggies which are pretty much towards the end of the event and these buggies are really the latest in four wheel drive off-road racing.

MR: Sure.

MB: And what we're going to do is get the individuals and teams to compete against each other and really put their times together and then they can score points from that.

MR: I bet.

MB: But before that you've got mountain biking where we've got a twenty minute cross-country and downhill loop section.

MR: I guess you've got to be fairly fit for that.

MB: You have, yeah, I think you have but fifty percent of is downhill so don't pedal, don't brake.

MR: sounding better by the moment I have to bet.

MB: But it's downhill and it's pretty extreme and you need to have some experience on the mountain bikes. If not, don't bring your shopping bike, basket on the front!

MR: No.

MB: And then before that it's white-water rafting so all these - it just gets more extreme as it goes on and then right at the end we get the whole teams together. They're in teams of four so you've got ten teams of four people and all of their points will collate to give you a top ten position.

MR: So there will be a team winner.

MB: Yes, we're not looking at an individuals event, it's a team event.

MR: And that's important actually because with events like this you've got to rely on your team mates, haven't you.

MB: Yeah, that's right. Yeah, you have because nine times out of ten your score is about getting your last man home so it's ideal to have someone small at the back, someone big at the front that's quite fit and can drag up the other ones.

MR: Of course. Reckon I might be good for the back of the team maybe. Ollie wants to know, he's got a great question, well Ollie you're a year younger than I am so I want to ask this question as well. He says, "I'm thirty-five ...", I'm thirty-six, "... am I too old to start getting into this outdoor pursuit?"

MB: Well, in truth, no. Because I'm thirty-four.

MR: Excellent!

MB: And as much as I've been involved in this sort of thing since I was nine earlier ...

MR: Indeed.

MB: No, I don't think so because I don't think you have to be anything special to put on a wetsuit and go down a white-water raft. You just need it within you to do it. You don't have to be anything special at all.

MR: I'm guessing it's not the pursuit if you get sick on roller-coasters though.

MB: Probably not, no.

MR: But if you get sick on roller-coasters you probably wouldn't be thinking about it anyway, to be fair.

MB: Exactly.

MR: So how long's the pursuit in total? Is it two days, a week, what?

MB: It goes over one day.

MR: Oh, okay. Well, George, thank you for your question because he wanted to know. So all of those activities in one day, how on earth do you fit all of that in?

MB: Yeah, it's very difficult actually, how we do that but what we do is we start early. The event starts ...

MR: Well we can see the map again, so we start at the Isle of Skye, as you can see there

MB: Yeah, we start at seven thirty in the morning and they'll ride ribs, which are these really high powered boats to the castle. Once they get to Eilean-Donan castle they then do this hill climb which is about a twenty minute run which is pretty hard going, that's the hardest bit for me, I'll be puffing, I'll be tripping over my tongue.

MR: So after that you think it's easier way home after that.

MB: Yes, yeah, I do.

MR: So after the run?

MB: After the run then you've got a rock climb and then an abseil back down it, which is great. I've been and done that and it's fantastic, I've never done it before and I thought it was great. You run back down the hill which is the easier bit and then we transport people in vehicles between each stage so then you're not swimming around Loch Ness.

MR: Oh, okay so you're not literally walking the whole of Scotland then.

MB: No, no, not at all. So you get to Invergarry and you've got the white-water rafting.

MR: Excellent, and that's the bit you're looking forward to.

MB: Yeah, that's the great bit. Ten minutes down the road from there you've got mountain biking. Then from there you'll go to Drumnadrochit which is where the off-road race, the rage buggy race will be.

MR: That's the bit we saw a moment ago.

MB: ... that's it.

MR: And so it finishes up in Inverness with what, kayaking?

MB: Well it's a kayak / canoe race where people will come from the rage buggies and they'll literally run down the hill into their boats and then they'll paddle their way in down the river into Inverness and they'll finish right in the middle of Inverness.

MR: It sounds just brilliant, it really does! Rick has sent us a question, thanks for your question Rick. He says, "Do you do any other outdoor pursuits apart from motorcross yourself now?" almost to try and get into training, abseiling and stuff, you were talking about a bit of rock climbing.

MB: Yeah, mountain biking has been something that I've always done as well. I did do lots of other sports.

MR: Two wheels of all kinds then.

MB: Yeah, yeah, that's it. It's kind of - when you've finished motorcross then you go into mountain biking, that kind of happens a lot. So other than motorcross, that's one of my passions, that's one of my hobbies. But I'm almost at that stage at the minute where I'm spending so much time organising and thinking of ideas for events that I'm forgetting about myself a little bit so I'm not doing so much at the minute and I actually need to.

MR: Fair enough, so that must be why you're really looking forward to doing this.

MR: Fair enough, so that must be why you're really looking forward to doing this.

MR: Why that particular area of Scotland?

MB: Purely because of Drambuie.

MB: Purely because of Drambuie.

MB: We came together with the same idea. You know Drambuie were very keen to do this sort of thing where they were introducing a person like myself that is going out at the weekend and is interested in sport but sport isn't the only thing you're into and at the same time we're interested in doing an event that was very, very different that didn't hit out to the pro adventure racer. So the two came together really, really well so we're both looking at doing exactly the same thing.

MR: It sounds absolutely brilliant. We've only got ten minutes left in the programme so please do submit your questions to Matt here if you would like to find out more either about his background or about the pursuit itself and how you can get involved. We'll be finding out how you can get involved in just a moment's time. Just submit a question in the box at the bottom of the screen. If you want more information of course go to the web-link at the bottom of the page. Toby's sent us a question, thank you for your question, Toby, "Will the Drambuie Pursuit become an annual event ..." I think that's what we all want to know, "... and what changes have you planned for next year already?"

MB: We were only discussing this last week and although we haven't yet run the event you've always got to think on.

MB: We were only discussing this last week and although we haven't yet run the event you've always got to think on.

MB: That's right and really I think if we were to do this event next year it should really be the best thing that we could do. I believe the way to then take the event on from there is to take it to more people because we've already created the demand and that's only going to increase once we put the event out there.

MR: Of course. Absolutely.

MB: And then literally say to these guys, 'Right your job is to get from the Isle of Skye to Inverness and there's no motor power in between and you'll have to swim Loch Ness, you'll have to run in between' and it'll be a weekend event where it'll be a little bit more extreme but then it will hit out to a more adventure racer but we still will avoid it from being that difficult that it almost becomes ...

MR: Not exclusive.

MB: No, that's right. Ideally we don't want a team of tri-athletes, that's not the idea, it really isn't and so I believe that's the way forward with the event, just to put more into it and perhaps put it over a weekend instead of a day.

MR: Fantastic, well that's 29th of April that you're doing this year's one. How long in the making has this been taken to put together?

MB: The best part of nine months, I would say. The idea came a year ago and then the hard planning nine months because obviously there's a whole lot more than just my side which is the event organisation. There's the whole PR / marketing.

MR: Of course, absolutely.

MB: And the dressing of the event, the creation, the ideas and so on. It's got a lot of people beside me that are helping to put this great event together and again, we're working with the brand to do that.

MR: It also sounds like something that the TV companies, if they haven't jumped on already, will want to jump on in the future, something like Five or Bravo, something like that to actually get the TV coverage of.

MB: Yeah, that's right, well this event will be televised. This will go out onto Channel Four in November.

MR: Well, that's good so that adds a whole extra dimension to it.

MR: Well, that's good so that adds a whole extra dimension to it.

MR: Absolutely, well that brings us to a very interesting point because when it's shown on television you will suddenly get a whole load more people interested.

MB: That's right.

MR: And people do want to know already from the questions we've had, how they can get involved as well. Is it too early to be thinking about that at the moment?

MB: No, I don't think so. I think if you're genuinely interested in being part of this event although there's no chance you're probably going to get in this year ...

MB: No, I don't think so. I think if you're genuinely interested in being part of this event although there's no chance you're probably going to get in this year ...

MB: Yeah, it's still to log on to www.drambuiepursuit.com and register your interest and we'll keep that information and then keep on forwarding details to you. I think that's the wisest thing to do.

MR: And then you can decide a bit later on whether you're actually up for the job or not. Peter sent us a question, thank you for your question, Peter. He says, "A lot of my friends have been going on pursuits for stag dos ..." yeah, I've heard about this as well, "... and they've been telling me what amazing experiences they've had. Why have they suddenly become so popular?" because it's really taken off.

MB: Because they're more available. You're supplying the demand.

MB: Because they're more available. You're supplying the demand.

MB: Of course, it is yeah. And people are realising, event organisers are realising. Particularly the stag do organisers have recognised that you can do a whole lot more than organise a limo to take the boys to a night club for the night. There's a whole lot more, there's quads, rage buggies, mountain climbing.

MB: Of course, it is yeah. And people are realising, event organisers are realising. Particularly the stag do organisers have recognised that you can do a whole lot more than organise a limo to take the boys to a night club for the night. There's a whole lot more, there's quads, rage buggies, mountain climbing.

MB: ... diving, there's anything.

MR: Is there a real macho thing behind this, I mean are people trying to prove themselves do you think?

MB: Of course, that's natural isn't it.

MR: Hahah, that's an honest answer.

MB: There has to be because if you're into this type of sport, the biggest person you're wanting to prove something to is yourself, that's natural.

MR: Of course, fair enough.

MB: When I was racing motorcross if that jump was sixty feet but to actually be comfortable it was seventy, you'd want to prove to yourself that you could do it and, of course this is what these sorts of sports are about.

MR: And I guess, you were talking about it works better in teams. If you've got a stag do going, you've got quite a few people that you can split into teams anyway.

MB: Yeah, that's right, that's it. I believe this is perhaps the next type of stag do, he's going to be doing this whole sort of pursuit thing more than just a day, maybe over a whole weekend and so on.

MR: Did it come do you think from fairly small roots in things like paintball because that was the first thing that got people kind of 'We're outside, we're having a good time'?

MB: Yeah, it must have done because whenever I've been out on a stag do or so on that has included paintball now you're seeing that you're offered a whole lot more. You can finish your paintball and then go quad-riding and then get in four wheel drives before they take you down to the nightclub and get you wrecked.

MR: Bad news perhaps for David Beckham, do you think that these kinds of outdoor sports, extreme sports, are going to be overtaking traditional sports eventually?

MB: Yes and no. I'm not a fan of mainstream sports because you just jump on the bandwagon with everybody else but I believe that there is enough people living in our country and in the world that both can operate successfully.

MR: Okay.

MB: So in answer to the question, no I don't believe this sort of thing will ever overtake like football but it will be very, very successful.

MB: So in answer to the question, no I don't believe this sort of thing will ever overtake like football but it will be very, very successful.

MB: That's right. Exactly and let's face it, we mentioned TV earlier. You'd much rather see this sort of thing on TV than balls being kicked around or hit with things. It's more extreme. There's a lot of people out there want to see more action and that's why it will be successful.

MR: It sounds fantastic and we wish you the best of luck on April 29th. You did mention the party afterwards and we've got a couple of drinks made from Drambuie here. The lime especially goes particularly well with it. I suspect you'll be downing a few of these straight afterwards won't you.

MB: Yeah, yeah, I have no doubt, and so will all the boys that will be taking part in it.

MB: But it's Drambuie, soda, ice and lime so it's actually a really nice drink.

MB: But it's Drambuie, soda, ice and lime so it's actually a really nice drink.

MB: That's right but you do know that you've got to drink all of that!

MR: Absolutely. Have I got to do it before the end of the programme. Yeah, I'll give it a try, why not. The link between Drambuie, as we were saying right at the beginning of the programme, is actually Bonnie Prince Charlie's route. That's why you've picked that bit of Scotland, it's actually his route across Scotland.

MB: Yes.

MR: And he came up with the original recipe of Drambuie. You can find out more at the website link at the bottom of the page which is www.drambuiepursuit.com, there's a link at the bottom of our page there. And that's the nice thing about this kind of drink because it actually does give a real connection, doesn't it.

MB: Yeah, that's right. It's not just a badged event, you know, this is something that is incorporated in the whole history of Drambuie and going to Scotland to do that, following the route that Bonnie Prince Charlie took, that's unique. There's very few events can actually say that they open up the doors and look back into the history of the brand that's involved with the event.

MR: And how has Scotland reacted?

MB: Fantastically. It's something that when you're only trying to attract forty individuals to take part, you don't expect people to be really, really talking about it but every time I've been up there, there genuinely has been a great buzz for this event. Everybody you talk to knows that it's happening so we're expecting quite a few people to come down and actually watch this as well.

MR: How did you get to your team selection because quite a few people will have entered. You're saying you're taking forty along, how did you whittle it down?

MB: We looked really at what they've been involved with, what they do and are you into this type of thing. We've looked at each individual or each team and, as I've said, we're not looking for an adventure racer, so obviously, that eliminates some people.

MR: Indeed.

MB: The people that fit the criteria of the brand, Drambuie, and they're the type of people we're looking for, people who want to come along, do sport, have fun but still have a life.

MR: It sounds absolutely superb and I wish you the very best of luck, Saturday April 29th is when it's happening, it's the Drambuie Pursuit. Matt Bates, thank you very much indeed for joining us.

MR: It sounds absolutely superb and I wish you the very best of luck, Saturday April 29th is when it's happening, it's the Drambuie Pursuit. Matt Bates, thank you very much indeed for joining us.

MR: And thank you for watching the programme and submitting your questions as well. We'll be back with another programme very soon.

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